THE 1975

THE 1975 "A Change of Heart" (Tim Mattia, dir.)

This would have also been a fantastic video for Springsteen's "County Fair" or even "Tunnel Of Love," and let me assure you: That's a compliment (even if it exposes my heart as old, suburban, sentimental, etc, etc.)

"A Change Of Heart" has 1975 frontman Matty Healy as a sad, silent-film clown who finds love on magically epic night of love and dance at the traveling carnival.

THE 1975 "The Sound" (Tim Mattia, dir.)

1975 in a glass box feels a little bit like that Battles video, but then a "discerning" crowd shows up to gawk and judge — complete with titles illuminating choice bon mots like, "They're essentially making robotic Huey Lewis tunes" and worse. But, don't cry for 1975. They (a) don't give a fuck, and (b) realize that their judgers are just as on display as they are.

THE 1975 "Love Me" (Diane Martel, dir.)

Director Diane Martel conjures up a very '80s, yet very contemporary video for The 1975 that's so ridiculous you might wonder if it's a joke. Fear not, fans: It is.

Singer Matt Healey released a statement with the video release saying, "With 'Love Me' we wanted to capture the neon-hued enthralling acquisition of success and excess, the screaming momentum, the sexy daze. Everything is REDICULOUS! But, is it? The only art worth any investment is art that makes one feel personally addressed. A simple truth, or set of truths, that galvanises an awareness and passion within an individual and in doing so immerses the individual into a sense of shared experience and community founded upon that same personal connection or experience. Too many artists care what others think. We are for the ‘community’! A non-linear observation on everything that has been and what will become. A lack of understanding of the world we are living in. The post-ironic notion of the modern world. Selfie mythologizing. Creating how we consume. Fragments of culture. Not settling for what you’re given. WE’VE JUST COME TO REPRESENT A DECLINE IN THE STANDARDS OF WHAT WE ACCEPT."

And then, he jumped back in the hot tub with his champagne.

The 1975 "Sex" (Adam Powell, dir.)

The first version of this video had the younger Manchester quartet performing in black-and-white in a poster-and-picture-clad room. This version.... is different. How? It's in color. And it tells a narrative of two young lovers in a cinema-verite style, which doesn't appear to end well. The old cliche "sex, drugs, and rock 'n roll" is certainly apropos here.