Great Guns

The Weeknd "False Alarm [NSFW]" (Ilya Naishuller, dir.)

How do you one-up the epically awesome, and ultra-violent first-person-shooter turned music video "Bad Motherfucker"? The answer is apparently not a movie based on the concept — director Ilya Naishuller's Hardcore Henry didn't explode at the box office — but another music video, this time for a huge star like The Weeknd, stunts far beyond Michael Bay levels, and even a sly reveal at the end. Oh, and lots of bad motherfucking violence.

Ilya Naishuller, director: "After Hardcore Henry, I was pretty much set on not doing anything POV related, at least in the near future. But when this track from The Weeknd came in and I listened to it, I couldn’t help but get excited for the possibilities,” says Naishuller. The key, in my mind, was to make sure that whatever I shot in POV had to be a step up from all that came before, which I believe my team and I have accomplished in the video for False Alarm. Apart from the faux continuous-one- shot feel of the video, the visual aspect of telling this simple yet elegant ‘crime doesn’t pay’ story was greatly improved by using the Codex Action Cam which was introduced to me by Starr Whitesides, our DP on the project. It made the film feel much more cinematic than is expected and took the visuals to the next level.“

Vaults "Cry No More" (Calum Macdiarmid, dir.)

Calum’s new music video is an evocative and sumptuous film for Vaults’ new release ‘Cry No More’. The song is about the resolution not to give up, for which the band wanted a video to tell a story of female empowerment.

Calum’s inspiration came from psychoanalytic dream interpretations and the ways it is used to help patients through dream therapy. The technique encourages a patient to confront and change the distressing elements of a recurring dream, gradually leading it to a better outcome and motivating positive behavioral patterns in real life.

Laura Doggett "Into The Glass" (Calum Macdiarmid, dir.)

Calum Macdiarmid has just completed ‘Into the Glass’, his ethereal new music video for singer/songwriter Laura Doggett’s latest track from her newly released EP.

The story of escaping an unhealthy relationship is told through a mixture of conceptual narrative and performance, scored by Laura’s unique, distinctive voice that many in the industry have described as ‘spine-tingling’.

Chløë Black "27 Club" (Calum Macdiarmid, dir.)

A strange lunch date with death himself that veers from smoky to sexy to surreal... Here's hoping it's not an invitiation to that 27 Club.

Calum Macdiarmid, director: “The 27 Club video was inspired by my obsessions with vintage wet plate photography and the visual aesthetics of French New Wave cinema. I wanted to create a film that was all about bold compositions and manipulation of shadows, so shooting in black and white felt like the most natural fit.

Chloe was a total gift. She was so committed to the concept from the get go. Even the pigs' brains and ants didn’t seem to phase her. Which was lucky given that the ants didn’t always behave themselves, scuttling away, trying to avoid the light, as soon as we put them on Chloe. They weren’t shy about reappearing all over us long after shooting had wrapped though."

Band Aid 30 "Do They Know It's Christmas?" (Andy Morahan, dir.)

Remaking something like "Do They Know It's Christmas" is undoubtedly daunting in the modern age. Do music starts circa 2014 have the same influence as they did in 1984? Can a charitable effort like this get attention when we're 30 years and seemingly 30 million telethons, concerts and collaborations later?

Unfortunately, the need is still there to raise awareness and money for what's happening in Africa today — this time the primary cause is Ebola, as opposed to hunger — but fortunately mastermind Sir Bob Geldof is still active and still able to galvanize people for a worthy cause.

And while the video is a simple affair in terms of the visuals, it was a complicated process due to tricky logistics and a superquick turnaround: The entire video was shot in tandem with the November 15 recording sessions, with a premiere deadline only 36 hours after the start of the session — leaving less than 15 hours to get to final edit. 

Andy Morahan, director: "This was a once in a lifetime opportunity to work with so many incredible artists. The level of talent in that studio was truly awe-inspiring. What Bob (Geldof) is doing is important and changes people‚s lives. Ebola is killing thousands of people in multiple countries and has the potential to affect the whole world on a truly catastrophic scale. The incredible passion with which Bob approaches the Band Aid project is humbling and I am truly flattered to have been asked to be a part of it.

Sheridan Thomas, executive producer: "The whole process, from recording and mixing the track to shooting editing and finishing the film, had to be completed within 36 hours, presenting us with a number of pretty unique technical challenges. The workflow within each and across all departments had to be absolutely seamless to make it happen. There was literally no room for error. I‚m so proud of the Great Guns team and so thankful to many of our regular collaborators, like our two DOPs Tony Miller and Angus Hudson, for pulling off what initially seemed like an impossible feat without a single hitch."

Band Aid 30 "Do They Know It's Christmas?" (Andy Morahan, dir.)

It's likely the all-star line-up that draws you to this remake of "Do They Know It's Christmas," but director Andy Morahan knows not to waste those opening few seconds on mere celebrity; Instead, we get a very direct look at the devastating effects of ebola.

After that we fall into the same model as the original Band Aid video, but with a new generation of stars: Ed Sheeran, Sam Smith, Rita Ora, One Direction, Ellie Goulding and Chris Martin — plus, of course, Bono and Bob Geldof from the original Band Aid, as well.